Fighting for Life

Trigger warning: this post talks about abortion and related issues.

There are various campaigns going on in Ireland, and around the world, for the protection of the Eighth Amendment to the Irish constitution, which simply states the right to life of unborn children:

The State acknowledges the right to life of the unborn and, with due regard to the equal right to life of the mother, guarantees in its laws to respect, and, as far as practicable, by its laws to defend and vindicate that right.

The current Irish legislation already allows for abortion in limited cases but the international pro-abortion lobby wants to expand access to bring Ireland in line with other countries.  There is to be a referendum on the 25th of May to test public support for repealing the Eighth Amendment.  The Irish government, mainstream media and pro-abortion forces outside Ireland (like Soros) are pushing hard for repeal.  One of the reasons used to promote abortion is the safety of women, but Ireland is statistically one of the safest places in the world to be pregnant and give birth.  Those statistics are an embarrassment to the pro-abortion lobby and so Ireland is being pressured to downgrade* its healthcare for women in the name of women’s rights.  Ironic, no?

If you would like to support the pro-life efforts in Ireland, one of the easiest ways is through prayer.  You can offer your own individual prayers, of course, but there are also organised prayer campaigns.  For example, EWTN have organised a rosary campaign that you can join any time.  There is also a fasting initiative being promoted in imitation of the successful, scriptural fast prompted by Queen Esther (a type of the Blessed Virgin Mary):

And again Esther sent to Mardochai in these words: Go, and gather together all the Jews whom thou shalt find in Susan, and pray ye for me. Neither eat nor drink for three days and three nights: and I with my handmaids will fast in like manner, and then I will go in to the king, against the law, not being called, and expose myself to death and to danger. [Esther 3:15-16 Douay-Rheims]

breadandwater

The Irish version of this fast is to be carried out on the Fridays of May leading up to the referendum, i.e. the 4th, 11th and 18th of May.  Supporters are to have only bread and water on these days.  Please join us if you feel able, but don’t endanger your health.

If you have the means, you could also consider donating to the various pro-life organisations in Ireland.  There’s the Life Institute in Dublin that’s running the SaveThe8th campaign.  There’s lots of information about the abortion issue on its website.  There are also Catholic organisations like Human Life International and Ask Majella that support women with crisis pregnancies.

We can’t use the hard cases to justify abortion on demand.  Threats to the mother’s life are already accounted for in Irish law.  In cases of rape, incest and foetal abnormalities, the testimony of mothers shows that abortion tends to add to their suffering whereas birthing the baby tends to be a positive and healing experience.  Other types of crisis pregnancy can be tackled by offering counselling, financial aid or adoption, and these alternatives should be researched, promoted, facilitated and financed in preference to abortion.  Repealing the Eighth Amendment will make that so much harder.  Please help Ireland set a good example for the rest of the world.

*Abortion poses a significant risk to the woman’s physical and mental health, despite what the pro-abortion lobby would like you to believe.

Advertisements

Posted on April 9, 2018, in Christianity, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. This is going to sound ignorant, but I’ve never understood how a woman could kill her child to save her own life. Not very empathetic of me, true, but I don’t understand.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I suppose we can never know what drives people to do the things they do. You’d have to be in a very dark place to see abortion as a solution, that’s for sure. And that’s why we need to be working on providing women with easy access to more options.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: