Monthly Archives: February 2017

Adoro Te Devote

I’m going to be taking a break from blogging for about three months. I hope this will allow me to put more time into my art and preparations for Easter. I hope you all have a wonderful spring, and I look forward to catching up with you all in the summer.

I leave you with a Latin prayer that might give a little insight into why the Church offers exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. I have copied a translation from Wikipedia below.  If you have a more poetic leaning you might prefer the version by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

I devoutly adore you, O hidden Deity,
Truly hidden beneath these appearances.
My whole heart submits to you,
And in contemplating you, It surrenders itself completely.

Sight, touch, taste are all deceived in their judgement of you,
But hearing suffices firmly to believe.
I believe all that the Son of God has spoken;
There is nothing truer than this word of truth.

On the cross only the divinity was hidden,
But here the humanity is also hidden.
Yet believing and confessing both,
I ask for what the repentant thief asked.

I do not see the wounds as Thomas did,
But I confess that you are my God.
Make me believe more and more in you,
Hope in you, and love you.

O memorial of our Lord’s death!
Living bread that gives life to man,
Grant my soul to live on you,
And always to savour your sweetness.

Lord Jesus, Good Pelican,
wash my filthiness and clean me with your blood,
One drop of which can free
the entire world of all its sins.

Jesus, whom now I see hidden,
I ask you to fulfil what I so desire:
That the sight of your face being unveiled
I may have the happiness of seeing your glory. Amen.

[Translation via Wikipedia.]hostonly

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Unexpected Discoveries at Knock Museum

I have lived within twenty minutes drive of Knock Museum for more than fifteen years.  I finally went in a few days ago for a class, but I still didn’t get a proper look at the exhibits.  I did make some interesting discoveries though, and I learnt how to make a St. Brigid’s cross.  My first discovery was made in the museum shop.  I saw some products there that looked very much like the kind of thing that I aspire to make, based on the Book of Kells.  The artist has a website where you can view and purchase his work if you want.

The second discovery was through meeting a Spanish lady in the class.  I couldn’t catch her name – Pilar – until she spelled it out for me.  I’m sure she was fed up of explaining its origins but I had to ask.  She told me that it is quite a common name in Spain, where babies are named in honour of Our Lady of the Pillar (Pilar in Spanish).  Below is a photo of a Marian statue on what is reputed to be the pillar in question.  It is obscured in the picture by a blue and white origami mantle (please don’t ask why; I haven’t the foggiest).  The apparition is claimed to be the first Marian apparition and happened when Mary was still alive.  Our Lady is said to have appeared to Saint James when she wished to gather the apostles together for one last time before her assumption into Heaven.
Virgen del Pilar

I thought it might be fun to do a post listing and describing all the Marian apparitions but looking at how many there are on the maps by National Geographic, I changed my mind.  There are nine major Church-approved apparitions, and the one at Knock is among them.  I would have only been able to list five of them before I started my research; how about you?  Have there been any in your area or country?  Knock is the national Marian shrine of Ireland.  You can see it marked quite clearly on the National Geographic map of apparitions in Europe.  So now you know where I live, roughly. 🙂  One day I may find the time to have a proper look around the Museum.

Happy St. Brigid’s Day

firststbcross

This is my first St. Brigid’s Day as a Christian and I’m in Ireland so I couldn’t let the day pass without making a St. Brigid’s cross.  People usually make these out of freshly cut field reeds but I, always having to be different :p, made my first cross at a class today out of something else.  I was so excited at the prospect, and the class was so chaotic, that I didn’t really catch what kind of reeds these were.  What I do know is that the demonstrator cut them herself at the end of last summer and she had to wear chest-high waders to get them.  Good woman!  She might have said ‘bulrushes’ but don’t quote me on that.  She told us that they can last for hundreds of years.  People used to use them to make household items, and she still uses them to make things that she sells for a living.