Woodland Walk

I’ve lived in Ireland for about 15 years now, and I’ve been looking for a particular kind of walking trail for all those years.  Now I’ve finally found it, and it was almost on my doorstep.  I can’t tell you how happy I am.  I haven’t had a chance to explore it properly yet but I took a few photos to show everyone.  The walk goes past the round tower and ruined church that I shared on this blog on St. Patrick’s Day.

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Posted on October 9, 2015, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 44 Comments.

  1. It looks like a very beautiful path Sarah.

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  2. It looks very nice, a place where one might find themselves. But spooky to walk at night, I bet.

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    • I was thinking the same thing myself Peter. I bet I would encounter more wildlife at night though. I didn’t get a glimpse of any this time except the birds. It’s the kind of place that badgers and foxes probably like. I can’t wait to explore further. 🙂

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  3. What a great place to have found Sarah!!, I’ll bet you have many happy hours in the future exploring and it’ll be great to watch as the seasons change too 🙂

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    • Thanks Caren. I’m so excited! We’re hoping that the rain holds off so we can explore it some more this weekend. 🙂

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      • I hope it does for you too!! Though in all your excitement…I bet you will still go even if it means wellies and waterproofs 😉 The twists and turns along the paths make for great photos of intrigue, hope you get to see some of the wildlife along the way too 😀 …..I wonder where the path eventually leads to???

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      • The bit that I did today goes in a kind of sausage-shaped loop, with part of it running along a stream. There was a “You are here” sign at one point which seemed to show that I had only covered a fraction of the route. The main route is roughly a big loop. I think you’re probably right about the wellies! 😀

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      • It sounds like it quite a large area, which is great, as hopefully it doesn’t get too crowded along the way. It’s so much better and a lot nicer to think you are the only ones in the forest on a nature walk. Look forward to pics of your discoveries! Have a great weekend wellies and all! 🙂

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      • Thanks Caren. I only bumped into one dog walker on my trip today so I don’t think the path is going to get too busy, even at the weekend. I’ll keep you posted. 🙂

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      • That sounds great! Thanks Sarah, I’ll look forward to it 🙂

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  4. Since you’ve been sharing my nature walks every Sunday for the last few years on my blog — I know you’ll TRULY appreciate how happy I am you found your own special place to commune with nature. The first photo of the two trees — it looks as if they are caught in the middle of a swirling dance. I anxiously await more photos. ❤ and shared experiences :D.

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    • Thanks so much Colleen. Your photos have been keeping me going but there’s nothing quite like being there in person, is there? There’s even a little stream. 🙂 (I’m doing a happy dance inside!)

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  5. What a lovely walk! I am now living in Vermont and it is reminiscent! Thank you. Pam

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  6. Definitely the kind of secret path I like to trudge along, a place of inspiration or peaceful contemplation 😀

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  7. happily i find
    this green trail
    fondly
    shared 🙂

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  8. What a beautiful dreamy path! I think I get a hundred haiku out of just one season of walking it. So glad you found a place so near and so incredibly beautiful.

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    • 😀 It’s so inspiring I might even manage to squeeze out a haiku of my own!

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      • I hope you do! or a tanka or a Bussokusekika – footprint of Buddha, like tanka except one extra line at the end making it 5-7-5-7-7-7 Nov 16 (my birthday!) at d’Verse Poets Pub, I am doing a posting of Japanese poetic forms. Come and visit!

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      • I wrote a tanka a little while back. I can’t remember whether I posted it though. Footprint of Buddha? Do you know why it is called that?
        I have made a note of the date, and I look forward to reading your post. The Japanese poetic forms I have come across require a lot of discipline. It is easy to admire haiku and tanka poets (for example) for their ability to convey so much with such a restricted framework.

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      • A standard tanka was found carved on a stone outside an ancient (even way back then in the Heian period). It had the extra line added to it. So, because of the shape of the stone and the tanka, it was given that name. It was extremely popular for a bit and then became obscure as people reverted to the standard tanka. One of the things I will briefly discuss will be haiku and senryu – people often call any short form haiku when it is not, oftentimes senryu – paternal twins as it were. I will give some forms and a brief description of them so it will not be so learned or long but I hope interested. At the Pretzel talks at the Poetics Pub, a pretzels post is a learning post and people will discuss via comments. I hope it will be interesting and not get too many people riled up with the brief discussion of haiku and senryu like the tanka and Bussokusekika. Two sets of paternal twins, close but no cigar. You are so observant and so keyed into natural beauty and the changing seasons, I think haiku would be a natural form for you. It’s a snapshot not a video of seasons changing is how I look at it. plus you are well acquainted with the Japanese culture. I’m going to briefly mention wabi sabi, mono no aware, and chinmouko.

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      • Thanks for all the info; very interesting. I look forward to reading your piece and the comments. Unfortunately, I’ve sprained my wrist so I won’t be doing much typing for a while but I can still do plenty of reading. Hopefully it will be better by the time your post is published.

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      • I hope so too! I am sorry to hear about your wrist and hope not much else was hurt. At least you can still read and take walks!

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      • I’m right-handed and it was my left hand that I injured. The rest of me is okay, thanks. Even so, it’s amazing how much of an impact it makes on the simplest tasks. Anyway, it’s feeling a bit better today; it only hurts when I move it, as opposed to hurting all the time. Thanks for your kind thoughts.

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      • Glad to hear this! I injured my wrist several years ago and worked (on the puter, filing, etc) with one hand. Lucky I’m ambidexterous but it was still hard.

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      • When I was little I wanted to be ambidextrous. I wanted to use my left hand, and even my toes(!), as well as my right hand but I guess it’s something that’s pretty hard-wired into our brains. My nanna was naturally left-handed but went to school during an era that wouldn’t tolerate that kind of thing – she got her knuckles rapped many times. She always said that that was why she was a bit funny in the head! My brother is left-handed, and I remember him writing from right to left in a kind of mirror writing. Not understanding that this was a problem as far as grown-ups were concerned, I was quite jealous.

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      • Good for your brother! I did the same and once, when being punished for writing with my left hand when they knew full well I could use my right, I wrote backwards and upside down! I was sent to the principle’s office and a note sent home. My mother wrote on the note not to bother her with such nonsense. Ha!

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      • 😀 I like your mum!

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      • P.S. I found my tanka: https://anglosaxonceltcreates.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/a-glimpse/ I hope I didn’t make too much of a mockery of the form. I tried hard to get the 5-7-5-7-7 syllable count, but I didn’t do so well with the contrast in mood between the first three and last two lines, and so on. Still, I’m happy with it as a first attempt. 🙂

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  9. This one has actually made me a little envious (Very naughty of me, I am sure). When ‘I’ want to go for walks, I have to walk on the sides of paved roads, the sides themselves being quite dirty. Add to that the constant noise of vehicles, not to mention the smoke! Sadly, plenty of Accidents take place too! Even fatal ones! Sigh! …And I am supposed to be living in a village!

    Just Huffing and Puffing a bit. Don’t mind me! Love. 🙂

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