Easter Eggs

My apologies in advance to my vegan readers; we used a lot of eggs in this crafting session. Please see my previous post for more on the egg issue. A small consolation is that no factory-farmed eggs were used: Sally bought duck eggs and was given chicken eggs by a neighbour who keeps her own birds.  Also, after writing the previous post I went out and bought a vegan egg substitute.  It won’t be any good for Easter crafting but hopefully I can now make cruelty-free cakes and so on. 🙂
Sally’s daughter supplied us with two kits from the States; thank you Erin. I haven’t seen this kind of kit in Ireland. There were all sorts of ways of decorating the eggs. My favourite was the wax crayon used to create “resist” designs with the dyes. I hope you enjoy the photos. You might remember the bunny ears from last year; my daughter has inherited the hoarder gene from someone (not me, obviously 😉 ).

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Posted on April 4, 2015, in Craft and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 31 Comments.

  1. Those eggs are adorable!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. yeseventhistoowillpass

    I used to love to color eggs!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I miss coloring eggs. The wax crayon was always a favorite part of the decorating for me — that and i loved to dip the eggs in different colors to get multiple colors. I’ve never eaten a duck egg. Is it much different than a chicken egg?

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    • I don’t think I’ve eaten one either. My daughter doesn’t want us to eat the eggs we’ve decorated. I’ve tried to explain that the eggs will go off but I’m fighting that hoarder gene. 🙂

      We dipped a few of the eggs in more than one colour too. I was fascinated by the subtle (too subtle for a photo) marbling effect it produced on one of the eggs.

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      • There is not much worse smelling than a rotten egg for sure. Is it the beauty she wants to hold onto or she doesn’t want to consume the egg? If it is the later maybe she would enjoy sharing the beautiful eggs when someone who needs food. If it is the former — I know how she feels. I never wanted to crack mine open either. But ultimately my dad got to have egg salad sandwiches and I had to wait another year for more beautiful eggs. ❤

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      • Yes, she can’t bear to spoil the pretty shells. It’s very hard to get her to part with any of her things. We have a clear-out every now and again where things go off to the charity (thrift) shop. She’s got better at that over the years because she understands that someone else will benefit from her generosity.

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      • I’ve never done it but maybe next year you could remove the egg and then decorate just the shell. There is someway to preserve it. I’ve seen the shells done this way but unfortunately don’t know exactly what to do. Love them none-the-less.

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      • Last year we blew the eggs. You pierce the top and bottom with a needle and make sure you break the yolk sac. It’s hard work though – like blowing up balloons – so I told Sally that I didn’t want to do it this year.

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      • It sounds like it might take all the fun out of it and then what do you do with all the yolk you blew out?

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      • As long as you don’t mind the fact that they’ve been blown on, you can use the egg innards for cooking as normal. Sally said her friend with the chickens beats her eggs and then freezes them.

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      • We eat birthday cake that people have blown on to blow out the candles so I don’t think that would be a problem especially since the eggs get cooked. I don’t think i’d have the patience to blow out the innards. It’s amazing how we have patience for different things. I spent an hour yesterday walking in the woods trying to track down the pileated woodpecker I kept hearing. I never did find him. But I can’t imagine spending a few minutes cleaning out the eggs. I’m glad you create all that beautiful art so I can sit back and enjoy. ❤

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      • Totally agree – we all have patience for different things. 🙂
        And thanks for taking all your beautiful photos so that I can enjoy the views from your part of the world.

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      • Photography is one thing I can do that time seems to be suspended so I don’t even think about patience. Ditto to your photos. I’m hoping to get to a few different nature preserves this year to show some varied scenery. Hope you get lots of time to spend on your art today.

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      • Ooo, looking forward to the new scenery. (Nothing wrong with the old scenery but I’m sure the new views will inspire some great photos.)
        Not much art going on here at the moment but we’re having fun anyway. The sun has come out to play. 🙂 I hope the sun has been paying you a visit too.

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      • The sun is vacationing in some other part of the world. Hope you got out in the garden — that is self is a form of art.

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      • Oh dear, sorry about your sun situation.
        I’ve had two really good sessions in the garden now. I’ve enjoyed it so much. Can’t wait to get out there again. I hope you don’t have to wait too long before you can garden.

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  4. Very nice. Brings back memories
    Can you make some with “Celtic designs” on the eggs?
    : )

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    • Thanks. 🙂 I could have done some spirals but I think knotwork might be too challenging. The wax crayon was clear so it’s very difficult to see where you’ve already drawn.
      I suppose one could create very intricate designs with acrylic paint or something like that.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. We also, when I was a kid, would dye some eggs a soft pastel and then take a piece of yarn dipped in an opposite shade and then “wrap” some eggs with the yard and carefully unwind or would take the yarn and overlap in shapes on the egg and unlap. Plus, the “old” kits also came with tissue paper with transferable designs. You’d dye the egg and dampen the sheet and wrap with the egg or part of it and remove. I remember there were also sections that weren’t for all over deisng but for just a section of the egg….they really were pretty. My favorite was to dye the egg a pale turquoise and then wrap it and remove the tissure. I’d have an all over design of tiny flowers, birds, and vines. Mostly though, we’d just use food coloring with some vinegar added to color the eggs. Blow dryers weren’t around so we didn’t have the heat shrink stuff. We’d have egg salad for a week! or creamed eggs over toast or deviled eggs. And if one raises poultry (they are neat just to raise and have around for company), it is better to not just let the eggs go to waste if they are laid and not fertilized.

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    • Lovely memories. I like the sound of the wrapped yarn method. Sally was telling me about the transfers that you mentioned. They sound lovely. I wonder why they don’t do them any more. Or maybe they do.

      As I mentioned to Colleen, I’m having difficulty persuading my daughter to let me break our decorated eggs. She wants to keep them. I predict trouble ahead. 🙂

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      • 🙂 I was told, dye some special you want to keep. the others will be for Easter only and then eaten. So, that solved that. The tissue transfers? some goody-goody probably found something “harmful” about them and so they were discontinued. they were really pretty. the kits used to have all kinds of stuff in them but with the times, things have been eliminated.

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      • That’s a good idea. My daughter is better with loss if you prepare her ahead of time. 🙂
        It’s a shame about all the pretty things being discontinued. I can’t imagine why a transfer would be harmful but I suppose some pigments can be pretty toxic, maybe that was the issue. But then, they still let kids put transfers on their skin. Seems a bit weird. Maybe it just wasn’t commercially viable for some reason.

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  6. What a wonderful day you must all have had :-), playing with colours and designs…there’s one sure fired way of letting your daughter know about the eggs…I’m sure she would love to have them decorate her room…..for a while……!!! ;-/

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  7. Great egg-dying stories from your post and from the comments. I have always loved egg-dying and those kits we can buy at every grocery store for a month before Easter. It’s such a common tradition to me that I hadn’t considered other people don’t get the same kits.

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