A Glimpse

My first tanka.

Glimpse TankaIn response to Artists For Peace March prompt I would say: take a walk somewhere green.Β  πŸ™‚

Advertisements

Posted on February 17, 2015, in Art, Haiku and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 41 Comments.

  1. It says that I’m following you but I’m not getting your posts. Did you set up a way to get the book????? I’ll send it when you’re ready. πŸ™‚ This is lovely.

    Like

    • WP can be weird sometimes.
      I can’t get the Kindle app to work. Do you have it in another format like pdf? Sorry I’m a nuisance. Wish I could join the 21st century and just get a Kindle but I can’t afford it at the moment.
      Glad you like the tanka. πŸ™‚

      Like

  2. Beautiful poem and I learned a new word today — tanka. I would love to walk that path. πŸ˜€

    Like

  3. So few words and yet they say so much! Lovely!! πŸ™‚

    Like

    • Thanks Caren. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • With any luck you might even get another lie in this weekend!!! πŸ˜‰ It has been such a busy week on the two quilts, I’m off to chill out now – hope those flipping elves make themselves useful overnight πŸ˜€ !

        Like

      • I got a bit of a lie-in, how about you? Any elves turn up? πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m afraid not, I was sure I could hear little elf feet tip toeing downstairs, so, I flung myself out of bed at 7.0 am to check out their night’s work on my wares on the table….absolutely nothing – it turned out to be Peppy pacing up and down waiting to be let out ;-/ Sometimes I wish we had a dog flap !!! So, not only no helpers in the night – no lie in either. Mind you I didn’t waste the day – lots more progress on the two quilts πŸ™‚

        Like

      • Well at least Peppy didn’t decide to help with the quilts overnight. I doubt her(?) needlework skills are quite up to the job. πŸ™‚
        We have a similar problem with one of the cats. She’s an early riser – and we don’t have a cat flap – but at least she demands hubby’s service and not mine. πŸ™‚
        Glad to hear the quilts are coming along regardless. Looking forward to seeing them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL you’re not wrong there! Peppy (he) knows at the first sign of fabric, rotary cutter and ironing board to disappear – so he certainly isn’t a help!
        You’re very lucky that your cat has decided its your hubby as doorman ;-)… especially on freezing cold dark mornings…I bet you’re not jealous at all you aren’t the chosen one!! πŸ˜‰
        All being well, it’s off to the fabric shop again tomorrow to chose a backing, though I’m not quite up to sandwiching together…still some applique pieces to make and sew on. With all the coordinating other bits and bobs for the nursery, Sarah suggested, I just hope I get them all done before the twins arrive! As its two of everything….don’t hold your breath on a reveal just yet ;-D

        Liked by 1 person

      • Nope, not jealous at all. πŸ™‚
        Is Sarah being induced? I don’t know anyone who’s had twins but I’d heard that these days they don’t usually wait for twins to arrive naturally. Is that right? There must be a lot of excitement and anticipation at the moment. I wish you all well. ❀

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you so much for your kind wishes πŸ™‚ The jury is still out on that one as far as I know… I understand Sarah really wants natural if its at all possible, but I’m sure she will go with the safest option for all of them, when the time comes! I hope she can keep her legs crossed for a couple more weeks at least until I get things finished ;-D

        Liked by 1 person

      • πŸ˜€ I dare say carrying twins is hard work, carrying one is hard enough. I wish Sarah all the best.
        Have fun with the preparations. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • You’re not wrong there! I know I am so glad I only had one at a time!! Add to that Sarah is tiny, barely just over 5 foot – needless to say she’s not been able to tend to her own feet for a couple of months… I know she’ll be happy to be able to put her own socks and shoes on very soon πŸ˜‰
        Still making good progress, I got into such a roll, the poor computer had to take a back seat these last couple of days!… But all’s going well πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh dear, poor Sarah. πŸ™‚ I remember how hard it was to do simple things like get out of the bed or the bath.
        Glad to hear you’re on a roll with the crafting. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Me too! Though it might be considered training for when middle age spread sets in LOL πŸ˜‰ Off to thread my first needle of the day now. Have a great Day too Sarah πŸ˜‰

        Like

      • Gosh, I hope I never get that round again!
        Have a wonderful day, and stitch up a storm (I don’t know what that means, my fingers just typed it… πŸ˜‰ ).

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL if I ever get as big as I was when I carried Jen – I’d insist on being wheeled around in a barrow I think – let’s hope it never happens!! My storm stitching reached the grumbling stage…so I thought a lunch break was in order πŸ˜‰

        Like

      • πŸ˜€ Yes, let’s hope we don’t ever need barrows. It might be hard to find anyone to push them.
        Knowing when to stop is very important. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m glad you mentioned swans. I haven’t seen any since the last time you attracted them into my life about this time last year. Let’s hope they show up again. ❀

    Like

  5. Good one, my Dear Sarah! Regards. πŸ™‚

    Like

  6. The words are evocative. This is lovely: words and feelings and image. And I learned about tanka too.

    Like

  7. Take a walk somewhere green.

    Great advice. And thanks for the virtual walk.

    Like

  8. Perfectly beautiful and sound advice too πŸ™‚ Will post on A4P 3/15!

    Like

  9. Beautiful thought and picture.

    Like

  10. I think this is lovely! And for a first try, you do excellently. I’ve been writing these things for years. I took down an old old notebook from 30 years ago and was embarrassed at most of what I wrote. others I marked to re-work. This is a poem I think you will not be embarrassed to look back on. Tanka, unlike haiku are written to be read in one breath. Ha! I often do not make it. This really is excellent. Like any art we take on as new, we need to practice….I am still practicing!

    Like

    • Thank you so much. I’m glad you liked it, especially as you are such an accomplished poet. I’m not an avid writer – I’m not compelled to write in the same way that I am compelled to draw. But when I _am_ inspired to write, I like the Japanese forms because they make me concentrate on the essence of what I’m trying to convey, i.e. they help to prevent self-indulgent rambling. I wouldn’t like to try to read some of my teenage epics in one breath! πŸ˜‰
      I’m a bit jealous of people who find their calling early and then are able to put in decades of practice. As I’m sure you know, the Japanese believe that a great artist/craftsman cannot even begin to claim any mastery of their craft until they’ve had years and years of intense practice. You are following that tradition, and I’m sure that you would impress the samurai poets of old. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you. You can’t see me but I just sent a deep bow your way. I like the Japanese forms for the same reason – cutting away all the fluff and just keeping the essence. Lordy, my teen ramblings were awful…..what an angst driven little newt I was! I still do free verse but then go back eleventy times to cut out so it doesn’t ramble on and on, unlike my comments! Many of the early tanka writers were women! Now, let that inspire you. and some of the haiku where they added on could sometimes be up to 32 verses….talk about rambling. I carry around haiku and tanka in my head for days before I write them down. You might like haibun too. A couple of verses of tight prose and then that haiku at the end to add the final bam! I think you could draw a tanka beautifully. After all, it is just drawing with words.

    Like

    • Thank you. ❀ Another of the reasons that I admire the Japanese culture is their respect for the woman as a member of society. The division between genders is not allowed to blur but a woman's talents are less overlooked. (I'm expressing this badly but I'm sure you know what I mean.) When most Westerners think of samurai they think of macho warriors but women could be samurai too.
      I like the sound of the haibun. Next time I feel a poem coming on, I will try a haibun. πŸ™‚
      Your comment about drawing a tanka reminded me of another interest of mine. Orthodox Christians refer to the "writing of an icon" even though they are applying paint with a brush. And then I am reminded of Japanese calligraphy and the fact that it is difficult (it seems to me anyway) in the Japanese language to differentiate between calligraphy and painting – it is all brushwork as far as the language is concerned, I think.

      Like

  1. Pingback: Why Do I Live Here? | Life in the City with a Future

  2. Pingback: A Glimpse | Artists4Peace

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: