Calligraphy Practice

I was going to do another doodle around this quote but there is too much writing.  I decided to practice my calligraphy instead.

calligraphypracticeAs with doodling, if you make a mistake it’s permanent.  Unlike doodling, you can’t cover up your mistake.  Here is today’s final version (click to enlarge).  The first verse is deliberately squished together but it does make it harder to read (see below for the typed words).  It is my attempt at the kind of copperplate font that my nanna used to use.Calligraphy2

It is a quote by D. H. Lawrence, and it says:

When we get out of the glass bottles of our egos

and when we escape like squirrels turning in the cages of our personality

and get into the forests again,

we shall shiver with cold and fright but things will happen to us,

so that we don’t know ourselves.

Cool, unlying life will rush in, and passion will make our bodies taut with power,

we shall stamp our feet with new power and old things will fall down,

we shall laugh,

and institutions will curl up like burnt paper.

 

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Posted on April 6, 2014, in Art and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 18 Comments.

  1. I just wrote on my blog how you inspired me to reach deeper for my creativity. http://lifeinthecitywithafuture.wordpress.com/2014/04/06/post-96-in-the-pursuit-of-love/ and then BAM there you are doing it again. Beautiful calligraphy and very inspiring quote.

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  2. What a wonderful post. I enjoyed it so very much. Thank you:)

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  3. I wish I could do calligraphy.. It takes an artist:)

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  4. Wow.. what great words to write (and rewrite) in your calligraphy work – which is gorgeous by the way. And thanks for the knowing nods at how, unlike in doodling, the mistakes are permanent. Good for you for finding so many ways to express your delightful creativity Sarah! You always inspire me. Cheers, Gina

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  5. Wow, so pretty! Seems the art of writing nicely (calligraphy) has been lost somehow.

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    • Thanks Stacey. We don’t get enough practice these days. However, there are probably people around who think nice writing is worth the work. In my nanna’s day they were very strict about neat handwriting. She was left-handed but she used to get her knuckles rapped if she tried to write with her left hand at school. It was very hard to write neatly with her right hand but she learned anyway. She used to wonder whether being forced to write with the wrong hand explained why she was a bit funny in the head. 😀 (She was only kidding around of course.)

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      • Too funny! But I think that is awful that they made her use her right hand. I seem to recall someone telling a story like that, and I thought it was so sad that they were forced to do something against their true nature. But that leads to being ambidextrous, right? That’s a cool talent!

        I am told I have nice penmanship, but I see so much that is poor – scribbling it looks like. I think the schools should pay more attention to it or base courses around it. Not everything can be done on a computer!

        Thanks for that story. 🙂

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      • You’re welcome.
        School was certainly tougher in those days.
        I always wanted to be ambidextrous but I’m very right-handed. I also wanted to be able to draw with my feet. I never mastered that either, but it was fun trying!
        Yes, it would be nice if they had courses in penmanship. Still, they’re learning lots of things in school that I couldn’t have dreamed of in my day. Time moves on apace…

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  6. I practiced a lot myself, before my first computer.
    Hand-written, I, too, still have me old poetry books.
    And Hesse is a hero in my eyes, and my favorite novelist.
    Had a stupendous “synch” moment when I went to the library
    and checked out “A Glass Bead Game”. Somehow, I knew him…

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  7. I love this DH Lawrence poem. I’ve seen in the first edition of a book called Earth Prayers.

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