Haloes and Angel Wings

I’m still researching and preparing for my latest project.  I’ve done some more sketching based on illustrations in the Book of Kells.  I find that sketching  allows me to absorb more information about the way the illustrations are designed and coloured than just looking at them would do.

I sketched a few more crazy cats and a weird dove:

morecatsAnd some angel wings and haloes!wingshaloes

StJohnhaloBy the way, you can click on the pictures to enlarge them.

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Posted on February 13, 2014, in Art, Celtic interlace and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. I don’t know why and I’m no expert but the St. Matthew halo had a Native American feel to me. I was most drawn on a personal level to Mary’s Halo. Maybe for the simple reason that yellow is my favorite color. I really like the greenish “scaredy” cat. This is most exciting to watch this project progress. 😀

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    • Thanks. The green cat is my favourite but all of them are such characters. They make me smile. I bet the monks had fun designing them.
      The St. Matthew halo has a step design on it that you see in various cultures. It’s a bit like the design you get in some navajo blankets isn’t it? (I couldn’t find a good example but you can see it on the arms of this jacket: http://www.soletopia.com/2012/12/ethnic-prints-look-tacky-but-this-one-is-dope/). I think certain patterns just pop up in the art of different cultures independently. And sometimes they migrate with populations and evolve like language. It’s fascinating.

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      • My family has been into watching a show lately called America Unearthed — basically its about how a forensic anthropologist — who is working to prove our history books are all wrong. Any way according to the show there has been physical evidence found pre-dating Columbus attributed to the Celts and the Vikings journeying to N. America. It shouldn’t be surprising that cultures have migrated from N. America to Europe as well.

        I agree there is joy in the cats. It interesting how this post made me do a rethink. I never put the thought of whimsy with monks. But now as I think of it, a group of people so devotedly spiritual, should be filled with joy. 😀

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      • The first time I met a Buddhist monk I found that I had built up all sorts of expectations without even realising it. I think I had expected him to be grand and not-of-this-world but he was one of the most human people I’ve ever met. All of the monks I have met since then have been the same – bursting with love and joy and humanity. I like to think that the monks who created the Book of Kells were like that. 😀

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  2. This is great keep working, a lot of cultural history has been lost and we need to work to preserve it.

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  3. Definitely reminiscent of the Book of Kells! Nice work!

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  4. I like those crazy cats.

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