Introduction to Origami

Maryam Jamil of entertainmentstarters asked me how I made the models in a couple of my posts – this one and this one – so I thought I should write an introductory post.

Up until last year I only really did traditional origami.  This involves folding a single sheet of (usually square) paper into a complex shape.  Origami purists would say that proper origami should not involve tearing, cutting or gluing.  Below is a picture of one of my favourite models.  It’s hard to believe that this 6-pointed, 3-dimensional object is folded from a single square sheet of paper, isn’t it?

washi Jackstone

Then last year I had a go at modular (or 3D) origami.  It took me a little while to warm to the idea but as you can tell from this blog I’ve developed a passion for it.  I can’t claim to be an expert on the subject but I’ll tell you what I have learned about it so far.  Modular origami involves the use of relatively simple modules that are combined to produce more complex models.  A lot of models just use one kind of module; like the Sonobe module which I mentioned in my last post, or the triangular unit used in “Golden Venture” models like my swan.  Other models may use two (or more, I guess) different kinds of modules, like the one in the picture below which uses a pyramidal unit to join the flowery units together.

lillyball2

And that’s where I’m going to leave you folks because there is a colossal amount of information on the Internet for people interested in origami.  Just type “origami seahorse” or “origami teapot” into your favourite search engine and you’ll see what I mean.  (Who wants a paper teapot?!?)  On YouTube alone you can find videos to teach you how to fold almost anything.  I also provide links to some origami resources (like Mukerji’s website) in my other origami posts.  Let me know how you get on…

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Posted on January 7, 2014, in Origami and Papercraft and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 16 Comments.

  1. thanks for links and info.

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  2. Nice – a great pastime I think 😀

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  3. thank you so much sarah for writing this post
    i dont know any thing about origami till i read it in your blog
    i will definetly try them and let you know 🙂

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  4. You do this so very well, I’m hopeless, so I enjoy your attention to detail even more:)

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    • Well, I’m hopeless at the kind of beautiful, expressive art that you do and I enjoy and appreciate your blog because of that. Thank you for your constant kindness.

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  5. You never cease to amaze me, Sarah.

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  6. Quite a beautiful creations you get to fashion here Sarah… It must take so much patience 🙂

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  7. Very nice and unique.

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