Origami Inspirations

slinkyandbox I called this post “Origami Inspirations” because that’s the name of the book I used to produce all the models in these photos (except the slinky on the left).  The book is by Meenakshi Mukerji, and it was given to me by someone who noticed I was on a modular origami binge.  Mukerji gives a nice concise introduction to the origami techniques needed for her models, including charts on how to distribute different coloured units evenly around the different shapes.  She even provides a few mathematical proofs for the nerds like me.  She starts off nice and easy with simple cubes.  The cube in the first photo here is called a “ray cube”.  There are four units making up the pattern on each of the six faces of the cube.

butterflycube

By the way, I was quite happy with the way the slinky turned out.  It makes a very satisfying noise as it falls from one hand to the other.  I would have liked to have made it longer but it was gobbling up too much of my precious square origami paper.

The yellow model in the second photo is still a cube but with one fancy unit (based on a four-sink windmill base) for each of the six faces.  It’s called a “butterfly cube”.

The third photo shows models made with pentagonal pieces of paper.  Mukerji gives instructions on how to cut a pentagon from a square sheet of paper, along with a geometrical proof showing that the method should indeed produce a true pentagon.  5pointlillyanddodecahedronOn the left of the photo is a five-petaled lilly, which looks a little more realistic than the four-petaled version made with a square.  To its right is a dodecahedron with a flower-shape on each of the twelve faces.  Each of the twelve flower units is joined to its neighbours by five diamond-shaped units.  Unfortunately, unlike the other models, I had to glue this one together because it kept falling to pieces as I made it.  So I’ve really gone over to the Dark Side now! 😉 (Origami purists don’t use glue – I used to be a snob about such things.)

whippedcreamdodecaThe final photo shows a dodecahedron made from a unit that Mukerji calls “whipped cream”.  Pretty, doncha think?  I started building it around the other dodecahedron but it turns out that less is more: Pretty + Pretty = Hideous!

So, how about you?  Have you ever tried modular origami?  How do you feel about mathematical proofs, slinkies and/or glue?

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Posted on June 19, 2013, in Origami and Papercraft and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 31 Comments.

  1. They are really nice. My daughters like making origami crafts.

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  2. Love!!! These are so clever!

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  3. I have always been fascinated by this form of art I find it amazing what some people can create with it

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    • Thanks for stopping by. Have you had a go? There are loads of “how-to” videos on YouTube. All you need is paper (and maybe scissors)!

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      • First thanks for all the likes you gave me I never take them for granted. I tried some very simple ones years ago when I got into the more complex one’s I could follow the instructions but then I couldn’t remember how to make them again.

        I think I will follow your blog and see where you go with it 😊

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      • Thanks for the follow. I’m glad you don’t take likes for granted – neither do I. Plus I never “Like” something I don’t really like!
        I know you have a memory problem but I don’t think it’s unusual to be unable to do complex origami from memory. I would have to do a complex model many times before I could dispense with the instructions. If you enjoy making the models I don’t think it matters if you need to follow instructions.

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      • You make a valid point I can’t argue with that kind of logic 😊 I just made a rather nasty post it was aimed at two of my followers so don’t read to much into it

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      • I read it before I read this reply. It made me a little uncomfortable but I couldn’t think how to reply to it. I suppose I’d like you to not get upset if I look at one of your posts in my reader and decide not to open it. As an example, your most recent posts are about wills. I’ve already made a will and so I didn’t feel the need to read those posts. Plus I’m in a different country so the whole legal process is going to be different. Anyhow, I’d like to feel free to spend my precious time on posts that I think are going to be relevant to me. I wouldn’t expect you to waste your time reading one of my crochet patterns! I have found your other posts very interesting so I look forward to seeing what you write in the future. Is that okay?

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      • Sure it’s fine if I. Had to do all over again I would have made it clearer but I posted in a foul mood Buy we are fine!

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    • Great! Sounds like you need that break. Have a great trip. 😀

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  4. Wow! These are amazing!! I made a great Icosahedron once with sonobe units, it looked just like the one shown here: http://mathcraft.wonderhowto.com/how-to/modular-origami-make-cube-octahedron-icosahedron-from-sonobe-units-0131460/ My students passed it round so much it eventually got wrecked! Must try some more!

    Thanks for visiting my blog 🙂

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    • Sorry for the very short reply earlier – I was on my way out.
      Did you see my other origami posts (try clicking on origami in the Tags cloud)? There’s a model that looks like the octahedron from your link and a “twinboat” icosahedron. There’s also a Bascetta star which is pretty fun to make. I’ve put links in for some of the models that take you to YouTube videos on how to make them. Enjoy! 😀
      I loved your blog. I liked the idea that you were teaching disengaged children maths. I can’t think of anything more daunting but you obviously have a rare talent! I taught maths grinds for a friend’s daughter once and though I enjoyed it I’m not sure I did a very good job. I was much more enthusiastic about the whole thing than she was! Poor thing.

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  5. Reblogged this on Xbox2121's Random thoughts and ramblings and commented:
    This is my first repost I don’t plan on doing it on a regular basis. This is a hobby I want to give a try there are many videos on YouTube for stated ones with detailed instructions

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  6. I am working on one of the flower dodecahedron models and my join units don’t seem to have the right size or shape or ratio. Any advice?

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    • Hi, nice to hear from a fellow folder. 😀
      Do you mean one of the models from the Origami Inspirations book? If so, which one. (It’ll make it easier to figure out what might have happened if I know which model it is.) Have you made any other models from the book? You might be able to get more help from the author’s website – there should be a link in my post.

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      • Thank you for the quick response. I was able to finally figure out what step I was messing up on and am working on finishing up the model now. I do appreciate your offer of assistance and should I require assistance on any other models in the book, I might come back for further advice. Thanks again!

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      • Oh, I’m glad you figured it out. Do you have a blog where I can see pictures of your work?

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      • Yes, I do. http://jennifershafley.blogspot.com/

        I just started folding in January and started the blog a couple months ago, but I am loving both a lot.

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      • I love your blog – you’ve made so many models! Have you tried making the Lily of the Nile model from the Origami Inspirations book? If you figure out how to connect the pieces will you let me know?

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      • I have not yet tried the Lily of the Nile model. I am working on the final touches to my flower dodecahedron and have plans to start on a Tomoko Fuse model next. I am certain I will work on that model at some point, I absolutely love Mukerji’s models. I have several of her books.

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      • The Lily of the Nile is in Mukerji’s book but is by a guest folder. The instructions aren’t quite as good as for Mukerji’s models. I got stuck. There is a photo of my attempt in my “Origami Binge Running Out of Steam” post.

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  7. they are really nice
    can u tell how they are made ?

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  1. Pingback: Out With The Old, In With The New | Anglo Saxon Celt Creates

  2. Pingback: Introduction to Origami | Anglo Saxon Celt Creates

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